SACI News January - March 2020

The year 2020 has certainly proved to be a year that we will not easily forget.  We hope that all our members are keeping well and healthy during this lockdown period.  All our lives have changed dramatically and will probably remain that way for a while.  We hope that everyone is coping with the situation.

The year started off very sadly for the chemistry community.  We lost two eminent South African chemists.  On January 1, Professor Reinhard Richard (Rein) Arndt passed away.  Professor Arndt had served as SACI President from 1980-1981 and was a recipient of the Hendrik van Eck Medal of the Institute in 1996.  On January 2, we lost Professor Klaus Koch.  He was the 2019 awardee of the SACI Gold medal.  It also came to our notice that in May 2019 we lost Professor Mike Brown of Rhodes University.  He was world renowned for his work on thermal analysis.  He had been awarded the SACI Gold Medal in 2000.  We wish to convey our sincere condolences to their families, friends and colleagues.

Also, a reminder of the call for the 2020 SACI awards and SACI Fellows.  We would like to encourage all SACI members to identify and nominate deserving candidates.  The prestigious SACI awards aim to recognise and celebrate the contributions of members and chemist at all levels from the senior Gold Medal of the Institute, through to the SACI Postgraduate and Education medals.

On behalf of SACI we wish all our members good health during this difficult period.

Bice Martincigh

Content

  • SACI office address and times

  • Advertising in the SACI newsletter

  • Pay your SACI membership fees with SnapScan

  • In Memoriam

  • Of interes: Coronavirus

  • IUPAB Global Women’s Breakfast

  • 2020 Call for SACI Award Nominations

  • 2020 Call for SACI Fellows

  • Sections and Divisions News

  • Accelerate Sustainable Chemistry

  • RSC News

  • PACN News

  • NSTF News

  • IUPAC News

  • FASC News

  • CAIA Newsletter

  • South African Journal of Chemistry

  • African Journals of Chemistry

  • SACI and SACI-related conference events

  • Other Conferences

  • Vacancies

SACI office address and times

The SACI office, run by Laila Smith is located on the 1st Floor of Gate House, room 124. The telephone number is 011 717 6705 and e-mail address is: saci.chem@wits.ac.za. The cell number is 061 282 3477.

Office hours are from 8.30 am till 1.00 pm. She can be contacted at any time during her office hours.

Advertising in the SACI newsletter

The newsletter provides a means of getting messages to our membership. Currently the SACI membership stands at over 1000. This newsletter thus provides a means of advertising employment opportunities, conferences and workshops, and even for companies/Universities to promote themselves. We encourage members to use the Newsletter for advertising purposes. All SACI related conferences and events are advertised for free; if not a SACI related event there could be a small charge. For advertising costs contact Laila at the SACI office.   

Pay your SACI membership fees with SnapScan

For those wishing to pay via credit card please let Mrs Laila Smith know so she can generate an online payment and email you a link.

 

In memoriam

Professor Reinhard Richard (Rein) Arndt

It is with profound sadness that we inform the University of Johannesburg (UJ) community about the passing away of Professor Reinhard Richard (Rein) Arndt. He passed away on Wednesday, 1 January 2020, aged 90.
Professor Arndt served for twelve years as the first Head of the Department of Chemistry at the former Rand Afrikaans University (RAU) and is widely recognised as among South Africa’s visionary science leaders and research strategists.

In paying tribute to Prof Arndt, Professor Tshilidzi Marwala, the Vice-Chancellor and Principal of UJ, said: “Prof Arndt played a pivotal role in establishing the former Rand Afrikaans University in the 1960s, and led the formidable Department of Chemistry that we have today. As a renowned scientific researcher, he has contributed immensely to the formation and growth of many science programmes under the Foundation for Research Development (FRD), now known as the National Research Foundation (NRF).

“He also led a number of research initiatives under the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), among many other scholarly roles. He was an outstanding academic and researcher who helped lay the foundation for science in our country. May his family, friends and colleagues find strength during this difficult time.”

After matriculating at Grey College in Bloemfontein in 1947, Prof Arndt studied organic chemistry and business science, obtaining a DSc from the University of the Orange Free State (1959) and an MBA from the University of Pretoria (1957). His appointment at the CSIR in 1955 marked the beginning of a highly productive research period in his career, focused on the study of novel alkaloids. He left in 1967 to become part of a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity, the launch of RAU. At RAU, Prof Arndt established the chemistry department, which he headed for 12 years. His next academic post was as professor of organic chemistry at Stellenbosch University from 1979 to 1980. He returned to the CSIR as deputy president in 1981, where he played a key role in reformulating and restructuring the organisation in a fast-changing environment. He retired as FRD President in 1996.

With acknowledgement to: UJ Strategic Communications

Klaus Koch (1953-2020)

The new decade unfortunately started off on a rather sad note for the South African Chemistry community with the news of the passing of Emeritus Professor Klaus Koch from Stellenbosch University on 2 January 2020.  Klaus had been battling cancer for just over a year and although many of us were aware of his situation, the news that he finally lost the battle, still came as a shock to most of us.  For some of us it has not really sunk in that we have lost a long standing colleague.

Born in 1953 in Windhoek, in the then South West Africa, Klaus completed his schooling at one of Namibia’s top schools, viz. St. Paul’s College in Windhoek, where he matriculated in 1972.  Following this he was reluctantly conscripted into the South African defence force to complete a year of compulsory military service.  Subsequent to this, he enrolled at the University of Cape Town for a B.Sc. degree majoring in Physics and Chemistry, which he obtained cum laude.  This was followed firstly by an Honours degree in chemistry and then a Ph.D. degree under the supervision of Dr Victor Fazakerly, who introduced him to advanced NMR spectroscopy.  Shortly after obtaining his Ph.D., Klaus was appointed as member of the academic staff of the then Department of Analytical Chemistry at the University of Cape Town.  Klaus rapidly proceeded through the academic ranks at UCT and reached the level of Associate Professor in 1989.  After a long career at UCT, he moved to Stellenbosch University, where took up the chair in Analytical Chemistry in 2002.  It was really at Stellenbosch University, that Klaus came into his own as an academic.  He established a thriving research group, working on platinum group metal chemistry with a strong emphasis on the use of modern NMR techniques with the aim of understanding the coordination behaviour of these metals.  It is during this time that he really emerged as a world-renowned researcher in PGM chemistry and multinuclear NMR spectroscopy.  A testament to this are the frequent invitations he received to present his work at some of the most prestigious international conferences in the field.  A consequence of this was he was able to establish a wide network of international collaborators across different parts of the world, many of whom became lifelong friends.  His reputation as a respected coordination chemist was recognized also by the wider community and resulted in him being invited to serve as a member of the highly influential advisory committee of the International Conference on Coordination Chemistry (ICCC).  He served on this committee for over two decades, making valuable contributions to ensure that this conference series is today regarded as the premier event for researchers in the field of coordination chemistry.  In 2006 he was entrusted by the ICCC committee to chair the 37th version of the biennial conference which was held in Cape Town, South Africa.  This was the first and thus far the only time that this conference was hosted on the African continent.  Under Klaus’s guidance, it ended up being an overwhelming success.

As alluded to earlier, Klaus Koch was a very productive researcher.  At the time of his passing, he had more than 130 publications in peer-reviewed journals with these totaling over 3000 citations.  His research contributions have been recognized by several awards over his long career.  Included amongst these are the Heinrich Hertz Fellowship (Nordrhein-Westfalen, FRG), the Ernest Oppenheimer Memorial Trust Travel Fellowship and the Deutscher Akademischer Austauschdienst (DAAD) Fellowships to perform sabbatical work at the technical Universities of Munich and Leipzig, Germany.  He was elected as a Fellow of the Royal Society of South Africa in 2002 and a member of the South African Academy of Sciences in 2012.  In 2014 he became a Fellow of the South African Chemical Institute (SACI) and just before his passing, he was once again honoured by SACI when he became the recipient of the organization’s Gold Medal for 2019.

Over his long career he supervised or co-supervised over 60 post-graduate students.  Many of these students occupy senior positions in various organizations across the world.  In addition to training post-graduate students, he was also well-known for being a committed and passionate teacher.  Hundreds of undergraduate students passed through his hands and I am convinced that each and every one of them must have been impacted by the enthusiasm and dedication of Klaus Koch.  I can attest to this, having myself been one the first crop of students taught by Klaus at UCT during the early 1980’s.  He clearly made an impression on me and was one of the people who encouraged me to pursue a post-graduate degree in chemistry.  Since those early years he has always come across as someone who enjoyed interacting with young people and helping them follow their passion.  This has continued throughout his career and involved not only university students but also high school students.  In the latter part of his career he was jointly responsible for establishing one of the most successful outreach initiatives of the Chemistry Department at Stellenbosch University, known as SUNCOI.  The programme aims to assist learners as well as teachers from under-resourced schools to get some exposure to the practical work prescribed in the high school syllabus.  The programme was established in collaboration with one of the younger academic staff members, Dr. Rehana Malgas-Enus, for whom Klaus acted as an important mentoring figure during the initial part of her academic career.  This was during the period when he served as the first executive head of the Department of Chemistry and Polymer Science at SU.  During his tenure as HOD, he launched some important initiatives including a crucial review of the curriculum as pertaining to the undergraduate programme as well as a complete overhaul of the support staff structure of the department.
As a person, Klaus was a straight-shooter.  He always spoke his mind and never left you in any doubt what his thoughts were.  He could never be accused as being indecisive.  Once he decided on something he would go with his instincts and you really had to have good arguments to persuade him otherwise.  I suppose this was largely due him being so passionate about everything he did.

Although he had officially retired by the time of his untimely death, he was still active as a researcher and, in fact, at the time was still supervising post-graduate students.  His passing represents a great loss not only for Stellenbosch University but also to the wider chemistry community.  He will always be remembered with respect and admiration for his contributions to South African science in general and chemistry specifically.

Selwyn Mapolie, Department of Chemistry and Polymer Science, Stellenbosch University

In memory of Professor Emeritus Michael Brown
It is with sadness that we inform the Rhodes Community of the death of Professor Emeritus Mike Brown, former Professor of Physical Chemistry (1978-2003), Dean of Science (1986-1991), Acting Dean of Research (1994), renowned teacher and researcher, big-hearted academic citizen, and the first holder of an NRF A rating for research at Rhodes University.
Prof Brown passed away on the night of Friday 31 May 2019 at his home in Grahamstown surrounded by family, after a hard and brave fight with cancer.
Michael Ewart Brown was appointed to Rhodes University as a junior lecturer in 1962 having undertaken his initial studies at the University of the Witwatersrand. After completing his PhD degree in 1966 (only the 16th awarded in the Department of Chemistry), he worked for a year as a Research Officer at the SA Chamber of Mines Research Laboratories, before returning to Rhodes University as a Lecturer in Chemistry in 1967, to commence a long and dedicated intellectual career at our institution.  Professor Paul Maylam recently published a scholarly history of Rhodes University, which highlights the research trajectory that Prof Brown and a handful of others put the university on decades ago, and from which we continue to benefit.  It is no accident that Chemistry remains one of our top performing departments.
Prof Brown was a prolific researcher, a much-loved teacher and postgraduate supervisor, and an inspiration to all who followed in the directions that he opened up for our institution.  During his working career, he was the recipient of the Mettler/NATAS International Award for Distinguished Contribution to Thermal Analysis (1996), the Vice-Chancellor's Distinguished Senior Research Award (1998), and the South African Chemical Institute's Gold Medal (2000).  He was a Visiting Research Fellow at Queen's University in Belfast (1971-1989), at Cavendish Laboratory at the University of Cambridge (1980), and at ICI Explosives in Scotland in (1989).
In 1998 he was made a Fellow of the Royal Society of South Africa, and in 2002 became the first South African to be selected as a Fellow of the North American Thermal Analysis Society (NATAS) "in recognition of his distinguished scientific achievements as well as outstanding scholarship in the field of thermal analysis".  To mark the productive collaboration which began in 1971 between Professor Brown and Dr Andrew Galway of Queen's University in Belfast, a special issue of the international journal Thermochimica Acta was published in 2000.
After his formal retirement in 2003, Professor Emeritus Brown continued to serve the university and the international science community as a researcher and mentor of distinction.  Amongst a range of projects, he submitted a compilation of his key papers for submission at Rhodes University for a DSc degree, which was awarded in 2006, and attracted comments from examiners describing him as “an eminent scientist of international renown whose work on the international stage was of great practical and theoretical significance”.  He was subsequently awarded a Distinguished Old Rhodian Award, and was made a Distinguished Fellow of Rhodes University, an award made rarely to retired staff or associates who have continued to distinguish themselves in their scholarly field well into their formal retirement. 

The international scientific community continued to recognise him long after his formal retirement; as recently as last year, the International Confederation of Thermal Analysis and Calorimetry (ICTAC) bestowed on him a lifetime honorary membership, awarded on 26 August 2018 in Brasov, Romania, shortly after his 80th birthday.
He is survived by his wife Cindy, his daughter Linda, grandson Brandon, son Richard, daughter-in-law Spela, and extended family.  We express our heartfelt condolences to them, and to all who will miss him.

Mike will be fondly remembered for his generosity to his colleagues and students with his time, expertise and resources, his wry humour, his grace, especially in difficult situations, his enjoyment of woodwork, and his extraordinary example of scholarship and mentorship at Rhodes University.

With acknowledgement to: Rhodes University Communications

Emeritus Professor Michael Ewart Brown, FRSSAf (12 July 1938–31 May 2019)

The South African and international chemistry community, together with Rhodes University and the Royal Society of South Africa, mourns the passing of RSSAf Fellow and Emeritus Professor Michael (Mike) Brown, in Grahamstown on 31 May 2019 after a long illness. Mike Brown was born in 1938 in Johannesburg and matriculated from Highlands North Boys’ High School. His first degree, a BSc, was awarded by the University of the Witwatersrand. He was appointed to Rhodes University as a junior lecturer in 1962, completing his PhD degree in 1966. The newly graduated Dr Mike Brown completed a short stint as a Research Officer at the SA Chamber of Mines Research Laboratories in Johannesburg before returning to Rhodes University as a Lecturer in Chemistry in 1967. The Department of Chemistry at Rhodes University was to become his academic home for 36 years until his formal retirement in 2003. It was from here that he launched his long and distinguished academic career.

The South African and international chemistry community, together with Rhodes University and the Royal Society of South Africa, mourns the passing of RSSAf Fellow and Emeritus Professor Michael (Mike) Brown, in Grahamstown on 31 May 2019 after a long illness.

Mike Brown was born in 1938 in Johannesburg and matriculated from Highlands North Boys' High School. His first degree, a BSc, was awarded by the University of the Witwatersrand. He was appointed to Rhodes University as a junior lecturer in 1962, completing his PhD degree in 1966. The newly graduated Dr Mike Brown completed a short stint as a Research Officer at the SA Chamber of Mines Research Laboratories in Johannesburg before returning to Rhodes University as a Lecturer in Chemistry in 1967. The Department of Chemistry at Rhodes University was to become his academic home for 36 years until his formal retirement in 2003. It was from here that he launched his long and distinguished academic career.

Emeritus Professor Mike Brown was recognised as South Africa’s foremost researcher, and a South African pioneer, in the field of thermal analysis. He was the recipient of the Mettler/North American Thermal Analysis Society International Award for Distinguished Contribution to Thermal Analysis (1996), the Rhodes University Vice-Chancellor's Distinguished Senior Research Award (1998) and the South African Chemical Institute's Gold Medal (2000). He was a Visiting Research Fellow at Queen's University in Belfast (1971), at the Cavendish Laboratory of the University of Cambridge (1980) and at ICI Explosives in Scotland (1989). Mike Brown was also the first Rhodes University academic to be awarded an A rating by the South African National Research Foundation. A tribute from one of his former colleagues at Rhodes University, published in a recent scholarly history of the university, recognised Emeritus Professor Mike Brown as one of a small group of Rhodes researchers who decades ago defined and guided the upward research trajectory of both the Department of Chemistry and the university.

In 1998 he was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of South Africa, and in 2002 he became the first South African to be elected a Fellow of the North American Thermal Analysis Society (NATAS). Mike Brown shared a close friendship and productive 35-year collaboration with Dr Andrew Galwey, FRSSAf, of Queens University in Belfast. This collaboration, which began in 1971 when Mike Brown spent his first sabbatical at Queens University, ultimately yielded some 30 publications, many coauthored with postgraduate students, with a further eight publications in conference proceedings and two books. To mark this productive collaboration, a special issue of the international chemistry journal Thermochimica Acta was published in their honour in 2002 (Vol. 388, Issue 1–2).

Formal retirement in 2003 proved to be but a milestone and not the end of an academic road at his alma mater. Emeritus Professor Mike Brown, in addition to continuing his thermal analysis research collaborations, remained a highly valued mentor and a distinguished senior colleague at Rhodes University during his retirement years. In 2006 he submitted a compilation of research papers, from his life’s work in thermal analysis, for the award of a DSc degree from Rhodes University, upon which the examiners “unanimously heaped praise”1.

Further post-retirement recognition from Rhodes University followed in the form of a Distinguished Old Rhodian Award, and for his scholarly and distinguished achievements after his formal retirement he was made a Distinguished Fellow of Rhodes University. The latter award is an honour rarely afforded retired academics at the university. Finally, the International Confederation of Thermal Analysis and Calorimetry (ICTAC) fittingly bestowed on him a lifetime honorary membership, in August 2018 in Brasov, Romania, shortly after his 80th birthday, in formal recognition of his contribution to the field of thermal analysis over half a century.

Emeritus Professor Mike Brown is survived by his wife Cindy, daughter Linda, grandson Brandon, son Richard, daughter-in-law Spela, and extended family. He is fondly remembered by his friends and colleagues at Rhodes University and around the world, together with generations of students who passed through his classes and research laboratory, for his wry sense of humour, his grace in difficult circumstances and his deep commitment to scholarly excellence, and, on a personal level, as an inspirational teacher and researcher and a wise, loyal and generous mentor and friend. He is sorely missed.

With acknowledgement to: Michael Davies-Coleman Transactions of the Royal Society of South AfricaVolume 74 Number 3, 2019, p. 306

Of interest: Coronavirus

Link to Worldodometer facts and figures on coronavirus for each country:

https://www.worldometers.info/coronavirus/

https://ourworldindata.org/coronavirus

SA Medical School team in race to find vaccine for coronavirus:  https://www.iol.co.za/saturday-star/news/top-sa-medical-school-team-in-race-to-find-vaccine-for-coronavirus-46171433

IUPAC Global Women’s Breakfast

University of the Witwatersrand Event
When: 12th Feb 2020
Theme: "Building bonds to create future leaders"
Hashtag: #GWB2020
Background: Scientists from around the world were invited to participate in the IUPAC 2020 Global Women's Breakfast (GWB2020). This global event was held on a single day, February 12, 2020, one day after the United Nations Day of Women and Girls in Science. The overall purpose of the GWB2020 is to establish an on-going virtual network where women in the chemical and related sciences can connect with each other in a meaningful way to support their professional aspirations. 

The theme for GWB2020 was “Bonding to create future leaders” with a focus on leadership development. Women and men from all types of educational and scientific organizations from high schools to universities, to scientific societies, government and industry organizations were invited to organize breakfast events. Breakfast events involved institutions from across the globe and varied from small to large events. 

The School of Chemistry, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa (in association with SACI) participated in this global event which was opened to the Gauteng region. The event was well-attended with representation from many of the neighbouring academic institutions as well as some industries. The event was opened to female professionals and students. The event was made possible through generous financial support from the RSC and the School of Chemistry (Wits). 

 

University of KwaZulu-Natal Event
In line with the IUPAC Global Women in Chemistry Breakfast 2020 that is being held across the world today (12 February 2020),  we held a Women in Science lunch from 11.30-12.30 on the Westville Campus.

The invite for this lunch was extended to all the ladies (both Chemistry and Physics on the Westville Campus) including the technical and admin staff.

Dr Bongiwe Mshengu (Chemistry) and Dr Wendy Mdlalose (Physics) gave short talks on the challenges and experiences of being young women in science.


2020 Call for SACI Award Nominations

Dear SACI member – greetings!

Its time again to nominate deserving SACI members for the Institute’s awards. Please nominate deserving members of the Institute for the SACI Gold, Raikes, Chemical Educator, SASOL Innovator and postgraduate students for the SACI Postgraduate Awards as per the attachments. In addition, please remember to nominate the top Honours student from your department for the prestigious James Moir medals.

The rules and nomination processes are described in the two attachments provided – please ensure that the full nominations and the documents required, reach Mrs Laila Smith (Laila.Smith@wits.ac.za) by the deadline of 31 May 2020.

http://www.saci.co.za/saci_awards.html

http://www.saci.co.za/pdf/award_application.pdf

http://www.saci.co.za/pdf/james_moir.pdf

Kind regards,
Willem van Otterlo
SACI Vice-president

2020 SACI AWARDS

THE SOUTH AFRICAN CHEMICAL INSTITUTE


THE GOLD MEDAL
The medal shall be known as the Gold Medal of the South African Chemical Institute.  The medal is gold-plated, and bears the Institute’s name and crest on the obverse, and the name of the medal, together with the name of the recipient and the date on the reverse.  The award shall be made to a member of the Institute whose scientific contributions in the field of chemistry or chemical technology are adjudged to be of outstanding merit.  The medal shall be accompanied by a monetary award to the value of R10 000, together with a suitably inscribed scroll.

THE RAIKES MEDAL
The medal shall be known as The Raikes Medal of the South African Chemical Institute.  The medal is gold-plated, and bears a likeness of Humphrey Rivaz Raikes with his name on the obverse, and the Institute’s name and crest, and the name of the recipient and the date on the reverse.  The award shall be made to a member of the Institute, under the age of 40 on 31 December in the year of the award, whose original chemical research shows outstanding promise, as judged by the person’s publications in reputable journals.  It is further stipulated that the research shall have been performed in South Africa.  The medal shall be accompanied by a monetary award to the value of R2 500, together with a suitably inscribed scroll.

THE CHEMICAL EDUCATION MEDAL
The medal shall be known as the The Chemical Education Medal of the South African Chemical Institute.  The medal is struck in silver and bears the Institute’s name and crest on the obverse, and the name of the medal, together with the name of the recipient and the date on the reverse.  The award shall be made to a member of the Institute who has made an outstanding contribution to chemical education, as judged by the person’s published work in the previous five years.  Published work may be in any form and may be related to any level or educational context.  The medal shall be accompanied by a suitably inscribed scroll.

THE SASOL CHEMISTRY INNOVATOR OF THE YEAR MEDAL
The medal shall be known as The Sasol Chemistry Innovator of the Year Medal.  The medal is gold-plated, and bears the SASOL logo together with the inscription “Chemistry Innovator of (the year)” on the obverse and the Institute’s name and crest and the name of the recipient on the reverse.  The award shall be made to a member of the Institute based in South Africa whose scientific contributions in the field of chemistry or chemical technology during the year preceding the award are adjudged to be outstandingly innovative.  The award shall comprise, in addition to the medal, a monetary award of a value determined by the sponsors, together with a suitably inscribed scroll.  The recipient of the award shall be known as the “SASOL Chemistry Innovator of the Year”.

Past medalists are ineligible for nomination for a second award of any of the above medals.

THE SACI POSTGRADUATE AWARDS
The awards shall be known as the SACI Postgraduate Awards of the South African Chemical Institute.  The awards shall be made to student members of the Institute engaged in research towards a MSc or PhD degree and registered in a School/Department of Chemistry at a South African University, or a MTech or DTech degree registered in a School/Department of Chemistry at a South African University of Technology.  The number of awards shall not exceed five per annum, and the awards are limited to one per institution.  The recipients of the awards shall be known as The SACI Postgraduate Awardees.  Past SACI/Sasol Postgraduate Awardees are not eligible for nomination for a second award.  The award consists of a monetary award to the value of R2000, together with a suitably inscribed scroll.

The persons nominated should be considered as being “young innovative chemists”.  The characteristics of such a person are:

  1. Innovation

  2. Independence

  3. Enterprise

The selection criteria applicable to the award are:

  1. Has the candidate done something worthy of admiration in the experimental field (e.g. a new, noteworthy, experimental design)?

  2. Has the candidate communicated the experimental results in any useful way (in printed form, or at conferences or symposia)?

  3. Does the candidate have a broad appreciation of the role and context of chemistry as a science?

  4. Does the candidate play a productive role in his/her chemistry department?

The persons submitting the nominations shall supply complete curricula vitae of the candidates, detailing all academic achievements.  The group of people nominating a candidate must be able to assess the impact the nominee has made in his/her department.  Hence, a combined process of peer and supervisor review should inform the selection of the candidate.  In addition to the backing of the supervisor, the candidate shall require the support of at least one other member of staff of the Department.  The candidate must also enjoy the support of a number of fellow postgraduate research students.  All the support for a candidate must be submitted in writing.  The endorsements should mention how the candidate reflects the qualities enumerated in the list above.  Final endorsement may reside with the Head of Department, where appropriate.

PROCEDURE FOR NOMINATION/APPLICATION
The merits of the work of candidates may be brought to the notice of the Council either by persons who desire to recommend candidates (nominations) or by the candidates themselves (applications).
Nominations and applications should be received by the Institute not later than 31 May 2020.  Applicants must provide a list of publications, and/or non-confidential internal reports and other appropriate information in support of the application, together with curricula vitae detailing all academic and professional achievements.

In the case of the Raikes medal three reprints each of those publications considered to represent the candidate’s most significant work must be submitted.  In the case of the Chemical Education Award copies of the publications to be considered, together with any explanatory or supporting material, must be submitted.
Each nomination or application should include the names of two persons with knowledge of the candidate’s work, to whom reference may be made by the Institute.

Further details on these awards and the particular nomination requirements can be found at the Institute’s website: www.saci.co.za.

The Council may at its discretion suspend any or all of these awards in any year in which there are no suitable candidates.

REMEMBER TO SUBMIT YOUR NOMINATIONS!!!

 

2020 Call for SACI Fellows

The call for nomination for SACI Fellows is open. The Fellows membership category is the senior membership level of the Institute and is granted to members in acknowledgement of their outstanding contributions and services to chemistry.  We encourage all members to identify and nominate worthy candidates for consideration for this membership category in 2020.

The nominee must be a current full SACI Member in good standing with the Institute and have been a member of the Institute for at least ten years. In addition, candidates must have demonstrated excellence and leadership in the areas of both: (a) the profession, education and/or management of chemistry, and (b) volunteer service to the chemical community. 

The nominee completes the online application form available on the SACI website and uploads a comprehensive CV.  The proposer and seconder are required to submit their motivations for the nomination via the online nomination system.  All of these requirements must be completed before 31 May 2020.        

Link to the online application: http://www.saci.co.za/apply_for_fellowmembership.html (your member login details will be required). All nominations is done online.

Thanking you.
Regards,
Prof. Z.R. Tshentu
Executive Secretary of SACI

http://www.saci.co.za/saci_fellows.html - Requirements

http://www.saci.co.za/fellows.html - Current Fellows

Sections and Divisions News

Congratulations Patricia!  Well done!

 

Accelerate Sustainable Chemistry

Dear All,

I hope that this email finds you well. I am writing to introduce you to a project that you and others may find useful. This project is supported financially by Merck and a German Government agency and so has no costs for those who get involved. I have attached a flyer about the project.

The project provides a platform on which organisations can advertise (for want of a better word) the facilities that they have available. This database can then be used to bring together those that hold the equipment with those that need access to it. The organisation holding the equipment defines the basis on which access is granted. The platform can then be used to build networks of collaborators.

The intention of the project would be to introduce the platform across Africa, but they want to start off in South Africa so that they can work out the implementation in a well-established scientific system. They are looking for potential volunteer Chemistry Departments to start the project off. Do you know who would be the best people for them to discuss this project with?

My department here works with Clustermarket, the company that provides the platform, and we are very happy with all of our interactions with them.

Best wishes

Tom
Professor of Sustainable Chemistry
Dean of the Faculty of Natural Sciences
Room 305, Faculty Building
Imperial College London
SW7 2AZ
+44 (0)2075945763

RSC News

Royal Society of Chemistry Events Website

Our website can be used to advertise events from across the world – not just those organised by the Royal Society of Chemistry, www.rsc.org/events/africa.

So, if you need a simple website for your event, or want to reach a wider audience, then please submit your event to our website.  Simply click on this link and follow the instructions: www.rsc.org/events/submitevent

PACN News

                                                                    

  • Newsletters

We have recently launched a new mailing list and, if you have not already done so, you need to take some action to ensure that you still receive updates from the Royal Society of Chemistry and PACN in the future: 

Please share this information across your networks, and through your societies.  We welcome all to the PACN and we want to share our opportunities for training, funding and events with a wide community across Africa and globally.  Help us to reach those who could benefit from our work.

 Dr Helen Driver (nee Bailey) MRSC, Senior Programme Manager, Africa
driverh@rsc.org ; www.rsc.org/pacn; rsc.li/africanews

http://www.rsc.org/membership-and-community/connect-with-others/geographically/pacn/funding-opportunities/

  • I welcome you to the community:

a.     Join the LinkedIn Group: https://www.linkedin.com/groups/1900756
b.     Sign up to our newsletter for updates and opportunities:
c.     On twitter, please look up @hvdriver or #PanAfricaChem to find out more.

UK Research and Innovation (UKRI)
The UK Research and Innovation (UKRI) are looking for experts to join their peer review college for the Global Challenges Research Fund, and I wanted to make sure that the Pan Africa Chemistry Network has the opportunity to apply. Please share this with your networks, and advertise to anyone who may be interested in being part of the decision making process for UK research investment.

https://www.ukri.org/files/about/international-development-peer-review-college-call/

Background information here: https://www.ukri.org/research/global-challenges-research-fund/ukri-international-development-peer-review-college/

Please note – this is not related to the work of FASC, the PACN or the RSC, so please contact UKRI with any questions or queries.

Helen Driver

NSTF News

For the latest news see:  http://www.nstf.org.za/news-category/nstf-news/

The NSTF unpacked the National Development Plan (NDP) from a science and technology perspective. This was done as a service to its stakeholders in a series of articles that were published in this e-Newsletter. 
Read the summary of all 15 Chapters.

The proceedings of the NSTF Discussion Forum on Career paths for researchers – where to in a changing world? are now available on the NSTF website.  Click here to read. The media release, titled “Welcome the entrepreneur researchers” summarises the story.

The following are useful sources for this topic:

IUPAC

For the latest IUPAC news see: http://www.saci.co.za/iupac.html

International Younger Chemists Network
We are always eager to connect with new people.  Through your network in South Africa, the young chemists contribution would be incredibly valuable to IYCN if they volunteer their time to serve. Membership to IYCN is informal, we are first and foremost a network of younger chemists (35 and under, or within 5 years of their terminal degree) and we advertise opportunities and tools that will be relevant to that group of people. As we continue to grow and gain momentum, we will also be looking to organize exchanges and provide travel support to conferences. 

We are currently working to expand our network, we hope you can share through your RSA chemical society newsletter about IYCN.  I would also encourage you and the people to check out our website regularly, if we have an event coming up in your area this will be the best way to see it.
Fun Man - on behalf of the IYCN Board
Website: IYCN
Twitter: @IntlYoungerChem
Facebook: @IYCN.global
LinkedIn: intlyoungerchemistsnetwork


FASC News

ABC Chem Conference 2021

This event will be held at the Palais des Congrès –Marrakech, Morocco from 14-18 December 2021.  FASC will be hosting the event.  Please diarise the date.

We are hoping to have an excellent turnout from member countries at this event. More information will be made available in the months ahead.

 

CAIA Newsletter

The latest issue of CAIA news is available. Go to:  http://www.caia.co.za/news/chemnews/
 or e-mail: caia@iafrica.com for pdf files of news and information.

South African Journal of Chemistry

The South Journal of Chemistry is now 101 years old and we are pleased to note that the impact factor of the Journal is now 1!.  We encourage all SACI members to submit manuscripts to the Journal.  Journal submission details can be found at http://saci.co.za/journal.

An interesting comparison:

 

South African Journal of Chemistry

Canadian Journal of Chemistry

First Volume

1918

1929

Scope

The South African Journal of Chemistry publishes original work in all branches of chemistry.

This monthly journal reports current research findings in all branches of chemistry. It includes the traditional areas of analytical, inorganic, organic, and physical-theoretical chemistry and newer interdisciplinary areas such as materials science, spectroscopy, chemical physics, and biological, medicinal and environmental chemistry as well as research in chemistry education.

Impact Factor (2017)

0.953

1.084

Awards

Merck Medal
The award shall be made to the senior author of any research paper, for the previous five years, which has been published in the South African Journal of Chemistry, and which is considered to have made the most significant contribution to scientific knowledge in the field of chemistry.  It is further stipulated that the senior author be based in South Africa.

Canadian Journal of Chemistry Best Paper Award
This annual award recognizes the “best paper” published in the volume year of the Canadian Journal of Chemistry (CJC) by a scientist residing in Canada.

At the start of 2020 the editors for the journal changed.  They are now:
Editors-in Chief:  Professor Patricia Forbes and Professor Cornie van Sittert.
We thank Professor Tricia Naicker for the sterling job during her tenure as Editor-in-Chief.  She has now returned to her former position as Organic Chemistry Subject Editor.

The current Subject Editors are:

Organic Chemistry
Dr. Leigh–Anne Fraser, Director & CSO, Cerulent (Pty)Ltd.
Prof. Tricia Naicker, University of KwaZulu-Natal
Dr Edwin Mmutlane, University of Johannesburg
Prof. Gert Kruger, University of KwaZulu-Natal

Analytical Chemistry
Prof. Priscilla Baker, University of the Western Cape
Prof. Luke Chimuka, University of the Witwatersrand
Dr. Marc Humphries, University of the Witwatersrand
Prof. Vernon Somerset, Cape Peninsula University of Technology
Dr. Lawrence M. Madikizela, Durban University of Technology

Physical Chemistry
Professor Jeanet Conradie, University of the Free State
Professor Bice Martincigh, University of KwaZulu–Natal

Inorganic Chemistry
Dr Glen Maguire, University of KwaZulu-Natal
Dr Sam Mahomed, University of KwaZulu–Natal, South Africa

Chemical Education
Prof. Bette Davidowitz, University of Cape Town

Computational Chemistry
Prof. Cornie van Sittert, North West University

Material Science and Nanotechnology
Prof. Patrick Ndungu, University of Johannesburg
Dr. Lucky Sikhwivhilu, Mintek, Johannesburg
Prof. Nosipho Moloto, University of the Witwatersrand

Details of the journal and the editors can be seen at http://www.journals.co.za/sajchem/
All manuscripts since 1918 are electronically available online at
http://journals.co.za/content/journal/chem/browse?page=previous-issues

This Journal is published electronically.  The webpage is:  http://www.saci.co.za/.  The South African Journal of Chemistry, published by the South African Chemical Institute, has been publishing high quality papers, in all fields of Chemistry for 100 years.  The Journal went fully electronic in 2000 and is freely available through open access online (http://reference.sabinet.co.za/sa_epublication/chem).  It is a CAS-abstracted publication and is listed in Current Web Contents.  It is also part of the Scielo group.  It has retained its status as an accredited publication with the South African Department of Higher Education and Training.

We encourage South African chemists to publish in the journal!

African Journals of Chemistry

  • African Corrosion Journal (online).  Commenced in 2015 – a peer reviewed corrosion journal. This journal may be of interest to the “practical” chemists amongst the SACI membership. https://view.publitas.com/icp-1/african-corrosion-journal

  • African Journal of Chemical Education       
    Enquiries and manuscripts should be addressed to the Editor-in-Chief: email eic@faschem.org, PO Box 2305, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. AJCE, 2016, 6(1) ISSN 2227-5835 The online version appears in the FASC website (www.faschem.org) and in the AJOL website (www.ajol.info)

    Papers on any aspect of Chemistry Education such as teaching organic, analytical, physical, inorganic, polymer, green, climate change/environmental chemistry, ICT in chemistry and chemistry curricula as well as assessment in chemistry are acceptable for publication. We also encourage issues on chemistry and indigenous knowledge/practice, chemical safety, natural products and related areas.

  • Nanonews in South Africa   
    SAASTA newsletter. nanonews@npep.co.za. Prof Janice Limon, NPEP Nano News Editor

SACI and SACI related Conference events

ChromSAAMS 2020

  • 26th IUPAC International Conference on Chemistry Education

Dear SACI member

The Committee for the 26th IUPAC International Conference on Chemistry Education, ICCE 2020, is offering a total of four travel bursaries to provide support for the travel of emerging researchers and doctoral students based in an African Country to attend the ICCE 2020 conference to be held from 13-17 July in Cape Town, South Africa.

Applications can be made on the ICCE 2020 website at the links shown below.  Please note that submission of an abstract is a requirement for the application process.

Abstracts                 https://www.icce2020.org.za/abstract/
Travel bursary         https://www.icce2020.org.za/travel-bursaries/

Please circulate this email to those whom you think could qualify for one of the travel bursaries.
Yours sincerely,
Bette Davidowitz
Chair of the LOC for ICCE 2020

First Commonwealth Chemistry Congress – Conference Postponed

Other Events

NanoAfrica 2020

8th International Conference on Nanoscience and Nanotechnology in Africa – Conference Postponed

International Mass Spectrometry Conference (IMSC) hosted in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

International Conference on Pure and Applied Chemistry (ICPAC-2020), 6-10 July 2020, Mauritius, http://sites.uom.ac.mu/icpac2020

Other Conferences

International Conference on Pure and Applied Chemistry (ICPAC-2020), 6-10 July 2020, Mauritius, http://sites.uom.ac.mu/icpac2020

Vacancies

PhD Position - Organic Chemistry - UFS

 

 

 

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