Plenary Speakers

Matthias Bickelhaupt

Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Netherlands

Email: F.M.Bickelhaupt@vu.nl            

Web page: http://www.few.vu.nl/~bickel/

Matthias Bickelhaupt is chair and head of the Department of Theoretical Chemistry of Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam and holds an extraordinary chair in Theoretical Organic Chemistry at Radboud University Nijmegen. He is known for his developments in the analysis and theory of the chemical bond and methods for rationally designing molecules, nano-structures and materials as well as chemical processes toward these compounds, based on quantum mechanics and advanced computer simulations. His research profile comprises four main directions of research that are intimately connected and reinforce each other: (1) Structure and chemical bonding in Kohn-Sham density functional theory, (2) DNA replication, (3) Theory of chemical reactivity, and (4) Rational, fragment-oriented catalyst design. With over 15,000 citations and an H index of 54, he held an E.U. visiting professorship at Warsaw University of Technology (2013), was elected member of the Royal Holland Society of Sciences and Humanities (KHMW, 2014), and Fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry (FRSC, 2014). Among the academic offices he holds are editorial board memberships of various international journals, among which are Chem. Eur. J., chairman of the Holland Research School of Molecular Chemistry (HRSMC), and member of International Advisory Boards of chemistry institutes in Europe.

Scott Bohle 

McGill University, Canada


Email: Scott.Bohle@McGill.CA   

Web page: http://www.mcgill.ca/chemistry/faculty/scott-bohl

Scott Bohle is an inorganic chemist who has travelled widely before assuming his current position as a CRC Chair of Chemical Biology at McGill University in Montreal Canada. Upon completion of his Bachelor’s degree at Reed College, Portland Oregon, he spent two years teaching in the Peace Corp in the South Pacific Island State of Western Samoa.  He resumed his studies in chemistry at the University of Auckland where he obtained his Ph.D. in 1988 for research related to the chemistry of low valent phosphorus. This training was followed by postdoctoral fellowships in Freiburg Germany, with Professor Heinrich Vahrenkamp doing cluster chemistry, and at Stanford University doing biomimetic metalloporphyrin chemistry with Professor Jim Collman. In 1991 he started his independent career at the University of Wyoming and established new programs in the bioinorganic chemistry of NO and malaria. In August 2002 he moved to McGill University in Montreal. Current research interests include the biochemistry of reactive cytotoxins, the bioinorganic chemistry of malaria, and the synthesis of reactive nitrogen compounds. He has hiked, sailed, and climbed extensively in North America and counts birdwatching and orienteering as past times

Orde Munro 

University of the Witwatersrand, South Africa


Email: orde.munro@wits.ac.za

Web page: https://www.wits.ac.za/science/schools/chemistry/staff/prof-orde-q-munro/

Orde Munro graduated with a Ph.D. in bioinorganic chemistry (supervised by Professor Helder Marques) from WITS University (Johannesburg) in April 1996. He then spent 18 months as a post-doctoral fellow working on iron porphyrins with Professor Robert Scheidt at the University of Notre Dame (Indiana, USA). In July 1997 he joined the Department of Chemistry at the University of Natal (Pietermaritzburg), where he continued to work on metalloporphyrins and other functional coordination compounds. He is a member of the American Chemical Society and the recipient of numerous awards, including the National Research Foundation (NRF) President’s Award (2000), the Vice Chancellor’s Research Award (UKZN, 2007), and the Raikes Medal of the South African Chemical institute (2008). In 2011/2012 Professor Munro held a Visiting Fulbright Scholarship at the University of Central Florida (College of Medicine) working with Professor Mark Muller on mechanistic studies of gold-based anticancer compounds. Professor Munro has held grants from several companies (De Beers, Avitronics, SASOL, AuTEK BioMed, NECSA) and the NRF and is a participant in the Developmental Therapeutics Program (DTP) of the NIH (USA). In 2014, Professor Munro was awarded the SASOL Innovator of the Year Medal for his work on novel anticancer metallodrugs, for which he holds a full patent. After serving in various leadership roles at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, including a 3-year term as Academic Leader (Chemistry–Pietermaritzburg), he left UKZN (July 2015) to assume his current appointment as the DST-NRF SARChI Chair of Bioinorganic Chemistry at WITS University where he continues to work on mechanistic studies of cytotoxic metal chelates as well as the design of bespoke metalloproteins and phosphorescent tumor cell sensors.

Karine Philippot 

CNRS, France


Email: karine.philippot@lcc-toulouse.fr 

Web page: http://www.lcc-toulouse.fr/lcc/spip.php?article1178

Karine Philippot received her PhD degree in Chemistry from the University of Toulouse, France. After a postdoctoral position in catalysis department at Rhodia-Lyon, she integrated the LCC-CNRS-Toulouse where she is currently Senior Researcher and head of the team “Engineering of Metal Nanoparticles”. Her research activities deal with synthesis of metal nanoparticles and composite nanomaterials by following molecular chemistry concepts for their application in colloidal or supported catalysis and in energy. She is co-author of ca. 150 peer reviewed papers (including 5 reviews, 9 book chapters, 4 patents) and co-editor of the book “Nanomaterial in Catalysis” (Wiley, 2013)

Peter Sadler 

University of Warwick, UK


Email: P.J.Sadler@warwick.ac.uk 

Web page: http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/sci/chemistry/research/sadler/

Peter Sadler obtained his BA, MA and DPhil at the University of Oxford. Subsequently he was a Medical Research Council Research Fellow at the University of Cambridge and National Institute for Medical Research. From 1973-96 he was Lecturer, Reader and Professor at Birkbeck College, University of London, and from 1996-2007 Crum Brown Chair of Chemistry at the University of Edinburgh. In June 2007 he took up a Chair in Chemistry at the University of Warwick, was Head of Department for 3 years and is now a Professorial Research Fellow. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh (FRSE), the Royal Society of London (FRS), and an EPSRC RISE Fellow. Recently he was Marlies and Hans Zimmer International Scholar at the University of Cincinnati, Davison Lecturer at MIT, Distinguished Lecturer at Roger Williams University, Rhode Island, Glenn Seaborg Lecturer at the University of California, Berkeley, Australian Academy of Science Selby Fellow, Swiss Chemical Society Lecturer, European Research Council Advanced Investigator,  Mok Hing-Yiu Distinguished Visiting Professor at the University of Hong Kong, and University of Oxford RJP Williams Lecturer. His research interests are centred on the coordination chemistry of metals in medicine, in particular on the design of organometallic anticancer complexes, photoactivated chemotherapeutic agents, catalytic drugs, and the dynamics of precious metals at atomic resolution.

Keynote Speakers